Nothing will ever be the same

In his commentary on Matthew Eugene Boring writes:

 Moses and Elijah are here paired because they were both prophets who were initially rejected by the people but vindicated by God, both were advocates of the covenant and the Torah, both worked miracles, and both were considered by first-century   Judaism to be transcendent figures who did not die but were taken directly to heaven [i]

I am not a miracles worker, I am not a transcendent figure and not likely to be either. However, to so follow God’s will as to be rejected by the people, and to advocate for the covenant, and Torah (at least in its moral and ethical bounds) fall, if not into the realm of likely, then at least into the realm of Gospel calling. There is a much for us to learn about ourselves here as there is for us to learn about Jesus.

For Peter, James and John this is a boundary moment. If they continue to follow Jesus, nothing will ever be the same. The last Sunday after the Epiphany is a boundary moment as we move from reflection in light, to self-examination in sack cloth and ashes. As we go forward we go, knowing nothing will ever be the same.


[i] Eugene Boring, New Interpreter’s Bible,  Volume 8, The Gospel of Matthew, Introduction, Commentary and Reflections, 

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