A Grand Affair To That Uncomfortable Feeling

A sermon for Palm Sunday

Of the Psalms:  Matthew 21:1-11
Of the Word: Isaiah 50:4-9a, Psalm 31:9-16, Philippians 2:5-11,
Of the Passion: Matthew 26:14- 27:66

It is our tradition to read the Passion Gospel at the end of the service. The sermon is preached after the Gospel in the Liturgy of the Word.

 


You may recall that way back in the first week in February we went to celebrate my Dad’s 90th Birthday party. Everyone was there. All 5 children and spouses; 20 grandchildren and spouses and 10 + great grandkids; and an additional four cousins who live nearby and a some very close long – long time friends were there. There were so many folks there we actually had three different parties; one for friends where Dad lives, one for the rest of us who have birthdays in February, and there are a host of them, and finally the grand affair on Saturday night. And we all had a marvelous time.

That meant we were traveling on home Sunday the 5th. So, we were on the road for the 1st half of super bowl 51; no big deal, except that I follow the Falcons. We got home got unpacked found the game about halftime and the Falcons had this glorious 21 to 3 lead. And then I saw Julio Jones catch a stupendous touchdown pass, wonderful; we had a 28 to 3 lead. And then I made a mistake. I looked at the stats; and the Patriots led in every single category, except for the score. I instantly recalled the last three games; the Falcons had huge leads and had to hold on for dear life to win. I had this bad feeling; we had been here before especially in the last couple of years. And I had witnessed the Patriots’ propensity, for the inexplicable victory. You know the end of the story the Falcons lose 31 – 28; it was the biggest collapse in Super Bowl history.

This morning we started with a grand affair. It was not a re-enactment of Jesus Triumphal entry; it was more than that. It was an active remembrance of Jesus’ Triumphal entry into Jerusalem and our role in that story. We felt all the glory, and the laud, and the honor. We are caught up in all the hope and promise. We are certain that the Son of Man is on the ascendency, and soon he will throw out corrupt Jewish officials, he will drive out the oppressive Roman Empire. We will be free.

After his entry into Jerusalem, Jesus’ first stop is the Temple. This makes sense; the Temple is God’s home on earth. When he gets there, he turns over all the bankers’ tables who are exchanging foreign coins for Jewish coins, so that Jewish pilgrims can buy sacrificial animals. And then he drives out everyone who is selling sacrificial animals, likely setting all the animals free.

We are used to hearing this called Jesus cleansing the Temple. But this is not so accurate because he doesn’t quote scripture about ritual defilement and cleansing. He cites Jeremiah (7:11) who is criticizing the people who after committing egregious acts of injustice run go hide in Temple, behind its rituals and sacrifices. Jesus does this as the Son of David, heir to the long-lost throne of Israel. It is interesting to note the officials do not express concerned with the disruption, of the banking and animal businesses. They don’t say anything at all. But on his way, out, Jesus heals the blind and the lame, who are usually prohibited from the Temple grounds just as they are excluded from Jewish society as a whole. But what gets the officials’ attention is the children shouting Hosanna to the Son of David (Matthew 21:15). Actually, this makes them angry. I actually suspect, it makes them very much afraid. Matthew writes Jesus abandons them … [and] spends the night in Bethany (Boring, Harrelson)

We have been here before; we have had that uncomfortable feeling, many years ago. [dark voice] We know prophecies of destruction, [darker voice] and we know what happened. [pause] [lighter voice] There are no such prophecies today, and shouts of Hosanna to the Son of David! Hosanna in the highest heaven! (NRSV Matthew 21:9) still, resonate in our ears. And yet … [long pause] that uneasiness hangs in the air. One wonders ~ what collapse ~ is about to befall us?


References

Boring, M. Eugene. New Interpreter’s Bible Commentary The Gospel of Matthew. Vol. VII. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2015. XII vols. App Olivetree.

Gaventa, Beverly Roberts, and David Petersen. New Interpreter’s One Volume Commentary. Nashville, n.d.

Harrelson, Walter J. The New Interpreters’ Study Bible. Abingdon Press, 2003. E-book.

Sakenfeld, Katharine Doob. New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible. Nashville: Abingdon, 2009.

 

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One thought on “A Grand Affair To That Uncomfortable Feeling

  1. Collapse? Jesus’ resurrection will be celebrated in spite of the world’s divisions and strife. He will eventually put all things to right, and we need not fear.
    On another note, it’s so amazing that your father celebrated his 90th birthday! My Mom will be 89 on July of this year. How blessed we are!
    Love and blessings, Fr. Scott!

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