A Jawbone, a Grave, and a Different Way

A Sermon for Trinity Sunday: Genesis 1:1-2:4a, 2 Corinthians 13:11-13, Matthew 28:16-20, Psalm 8

You know me well enough to know I am not one to think that God micromanages anything. That is not to say God is not active, they God/Jesus/Spirit are active. It is a mystery I cannot explain, and do not feel the need to; I’m just delighted when I receive it and accept it. I was the recipient of such a mystery this past Friday, or perhaps all week. I read three articles from three different sources, one I accidentally saw on Facebook that answered the burning question for all preachers on Trinity Sunday

How do I preach on a topic that took the church 325 years to agree on and fought about for another 1000 or more; that we may not yet truly agree on?

 The answer is, don’t –[pause] well at least not directly. So, follows are three summaries from the three previously mentioned articles and then some thoughts about how they reveal the significance of our belief in God/Jesus/Spirit.

Paleoanthropologists have discovered the oldest fossils of homo-sapiens in Morocco, and those fossils have changed the thinking about our evolution. The evidence from these bones and flint, fond at the same site, have lead scholars to believe humans did not evolve from a single cradle in East Africa. They now believe we developed on the African continent. More importantly, the evidence indicates we evolved as a network of groups spread across that vast continent (Zimmer).

In January, the Smithsonian Magazine published an article about an ancient warrior’s grave in Greece. To refresh our history, the first organized Greek society Mycenaeans (My·ce·nae·an) appeared about 1600 BC and disappeared almost as fast. Then came several centuries of Greek Dark Ages. After that the classical Greek civilization, we are familiar with, emerges. The Mycenaeans sowed the seeds of our art, architecture, language, philosophy, literature, democracy, and religion traditions. If you have not read The Iliad and the Odyssey, you may want to, because Homer’s epic poem turns out to be more fact than fantasy. The recent discovery of a warrior’s grave has changed how archeologist think our civilization came about. Typically, we think in terms of the best warrior/king wins type of model. The evidence of this grave indicates cultures of the Mycenaeans and the Minoans, who preceded them, became intertwined. Jo Marchant writes:

Minoan and Mycenaean Greeks would surely have spoken each other’s languages, may have intermarried and likely adopted and refashioned one another’s customs. And they may not have seen themselves with the rigid identities we moderns have tended to impose on them.

The Minoan and Mycenaean Greek cultures blended, and it is this blended culture that we can trace our cultural heritage to. This blended culture is the foundation of Greek egalitarian authority and representative governance on which our way of government is based (Marchant)

WEB Du Bois, an African-American activist, historian, and sociologist, born in 1868, (NAACP). and James McCune Smith, the first African-American to be awarded a degree in medicine, born in 1813, (Black Past) were the first to document the health consequences of discrimination which is toxic to our cells, our organs, and our minds. Their work has been supported ever since. For example:

before the abolition of Jim Crow laws, the black infant death rate was nearly 20 percent higher in Jim Crow states versus non-Jim Crow states. This disparity declined sharply after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, such that the gap had essentially closed a decade later.

It does not matter what characteristic the discrimination is directed against, or if it is directed at an individual, or is the consequences of intended or unintended social or government actions. In the last several years research has revealed harmful inequities along geographic and socioeconomic lines that affect white Americans. Whites living in rural areas, compared with those in metropolitan centers, now contend with many of the same structural challenges that black citizens have faced for centuries (Khullar).

All three stories are about human relationships. Without being overly simplistic, in the two stories where the relationships are collaborative culture and civilization thrive; people thrive. In the last story where the relationships are oppressive culture, and civilization suffer; people suffer. God does not want people or anything in creation to suffer.

In the creation story of Genesis 1 you will notice that everything is created in harmony, in pairs or triads:

  • the heavens and the earth waters that were under the dome and the waters that were above the dome
  • the waters in one place and the dry land in another
  • two great lights—one to rule the day and one to rule the night
  • every living creature … in the waters swarm, and every winged bird of every kind.
  • cattle and creeping things and wild animals
  • humankind in our image … male and female he created them.

We are made to be in relationship.

Psalm 8 is in awe at the majesty of the night sky, we are fortunate enough to be close enough to really dark to be able to see the true majesty of the night sky, and the psalmist wonders why God would pay attention to him, or to us? It is because that he, that I, that we have work to do; to cultivate the earth, the fish, the birds, and every living thing. (Jacobson, Lewis, and Skinner). From the very beginning, God/Jesus/Spirit invites us to be in nurturing relationship with creation (Vryhof).

A colleague of mine blogging on Matthew 28:20 shares a definition of authority as followability (Pankey). Followability is a characteristic of relationship. And if nothing else is definitive, the Trinity – God/Jesus/Spirit is divine relationship.

We are created to be the image of the divine relationship. The quality of the divine relationship is the model quality of all our relationships, our relationships with each other as individuals; our relationships with each other as villages, towns, cities, counties, states and nations, and our relationship, individually and collectively, as villages, towns, cities, counties, states and nations, with creation. Pondering the nature of the God/Jesus/Spirit divine relationship is important because it is the model for all our relationships, and as I shared earlier, we know relationships matter. The quality of our relationships affects the evolution of our being. The quality of our relationships affects the manner of our civilizations. The quality of our relationship affects the health of our bodies, our emotions, our friendships, and our souls.

To celebrate this Trinity, I invite you to reflect on how you live in the mystery of God/Jesus/Spirit and reflect it in all your relationships. And then go share, not by telling, but by being the reflection of the love God/Jesus/Spirit share among themselves and with you.

References

Black Past. “smith-james-mccune.” n.d. http://www.blackpast.org. 9 6 2017. <http://www.blackpast.org/aah/smith-james-mccune-1813-1865 >.

Harrelson, Walter J. The New Interpreters’ Study Bible. Abingdon Press, 2003. E-book.

Jacobson, Rolf, Karoline Lewis and Matt Skinner. Sermon Brain Wave. 11 6 2017.

Khullar, Dhruv. “How Prejudice Can Harm Your Health.” 8 6 2017. NYTimes.com. <nytimes.com/2017/06/08/upshot/howprejudicecanharmyourhealth.>.

Lewis, Karoline. God Said Yes to Me. 6 9 2015. <workingpreacher.org>.

Marchant, Jo. “golden-warrior-greek-tomb-exposes-roots-western-civilization.” 1 2017. smithsonianmag.com. <smithsonianmag.com /history/golden-warrior-greek-tomb-exposes-roots-western-civilization-180961441/>.

NAACP. “w-e-b-dubois.” n.d. http://www.naacp.org. 9 6 2017. <http://www.naacp.org/oldest-and-boldest/naacp-history-w-e-b-dubois&gt;.

Pankey, Steve. All Authority. 6 6 2017. <https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/333491/posts/1485395986&gt;.

Sakenfeld, Katharine Doob. New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible. Nashville: Abingdon, 2009.

Vryhof, Br. David. Participate. 6 6 2017. Society of St. John the Evangelist. <http://ssje.org/word/&gt;.

Whitley, Katerina K. “The Mystery of the Trinity, Trinity Sunday (A).” 18 8 2017. Sermons that Work.

Zimmer, Carl. “Oldest Fossils of Homo Sapiens Found in Morocco, Altering.” 7 6 2017. NYTimes.com. <nytimes.com/2017/06/07/science/humanfossilsmorocco.>.

 

 

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One thought on “A Jawbone, a Grave, and a Different Way

  1. I didn’t know some of the facts you shared here about the incredible importance of healthy relationships in a cultural setting as opposed to those that would separate others from being in full participation with the dominant culture. Much food for thought as we ponder the mystery of the Holy Trinity.
    Blessings, Fr. Scott!

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