Asking, Answering, Believing

A sermon for the 2nd Sunday in Easter; Acts 5:27-32, Psalm 150, Revelation 1:4-8, John 20:19-31

Terry is a friend of mine from my home parish. We share 3 things in common: Holy Trinity at one time we were both in the computer business, and a love of good jokes. I’m lucky in this respect, he is the source of all kinds of great jokes and stories. Thursday he shared this:

 No English dictionary has been able to adequately explain the difference between these two words – “Complete” or “Finished”. In a recent linguistic competition held in London and attended by, supposedly, the best in the world, Samdar Balgobin, a Guyanese man, was the clear winner with a standing ovation which lasted over 5 minutes.

The final question was: ‘How do you explain the difference between COMPLETE and FINISHED in a way that is easy to understand? Some people say there is no difference between COMPLETE and FINISHED.’ Here is his astute answer:

“When you marry the right woman, you are COMPLETE. When you marry the wrong woman, you are FINISHED. And when the right one catches you with the wrong one, you are COMPLETELY FINISHED!”

It is amazing the truth we can learn when we ask the right question.

We all know the story of Thomas. We all know the story was wrongly named “Doubting Thomas” centuries ago. No matter what we just heard the word ‘doubt’ is now where in the passage (O’Day). The trouble is we get all caught up in Thomas’ reaction to the disciples telling him “Jesus is risen.” But think back to last week; the women come racing back from Jesus’ tomb and share their story, including that Jesus is risen. What is the disciples’ reaction?

But these words seemed to them an idle tale, and they did not believe them (Luke 24:11).

This verse is from Luke’s Gospel story, the equivalent verse in John Gospel story is unless I see … I will not believe (John 20:25). Thomas not believing the disciples’ story is just like the disciples not believing Mary’s story (O’Day).

To be honest, I simply wasn’t drawn to parsing the subtleties of all this again. I had decided to explore the glory of Psalm 150, the closing psalm of the Book of Psalms. the Psalm cajoles us

  • to praise God
  • where to praise God
  • why to praise God and
  • how to praise God, which is with everything we have, instruments, dance, and voice, literally breath, which is a sort of returning to God, the gift of life given to us as God breathed the breath of life into us (deClaissé-Walford) (Genesis 2:7).

My divine Muse had another idea.

On the road, between two events, and I have no idea which ones, or when, it occurred to me, I realized Thomas is just asking a question. It’s a hard question, and it is a risky question. Just as the disciples rebuffed Mary and her companions for a stance the disciples did not hold, the disciples may well have rebuffed Thomas for not accepting a stance they did hold. What matters is I was drawn back to John’s Gospel and Thomas.

So, I went digging. From the Greek – English New Testament Interlinear we hear Jesus say, “not do be unbelieving but believing.” The authors clean it up a bit: “Do not be unbelieving, but believing” (Olive Tree). Another resource for this kind of digging around is Young’s Literal Translation; which reads: “and become not unbelieving, but believing.” And that is the end of my search, the beginning of learning (Young).

I was troubled by the dichotomy, the stark choice between “be unbelieving”, and “be believing.” The key is ‘become’ which indicates there is movement from one position to another, thus, there is a gleaning; a choice to be made. The important thing in Thomas’ response to the disciples’ proclamation about seeing Jesus is not the parameters, fingers, hands, and wounds, etc., but the underlying question about Jesus and resurrection, and his desire to discover the answer, to discover the truth. While it is unusual to ask a question of one person or group and get an answer from another, sometime later, with no discernable connection between the two, it does happen. Thomas asks the disciples and Jesus answers. No matter how strange the path between question and answer, the glory in the story is Thomas’ confession “My Lord and my God!” (John 20:28). It is every bit as powerful as

  • Nathanael’s “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” (John 1:49),
  • or Peter’s “We have come to believe and know that you are the Holy One of God.” (John 6:69),
  • or Martha’s “Yes, Lord, I believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one coming into the world.” (John 11:27).

The last verse of this chapter is:

But these (signs) are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name. (John 20:31).

Here we find the purpose for asking questions and responding to questions. We should dare to ask questions so we may become believing and have life in Jesus. We should dare to answer questions so that another may become believing and have life in Jesus. I am beginning to see that in both the asking, and the answering we should take a queue from Psalm 150; we should both ask and answer with everything we have, instruments, dance, and breath, so that all may know the breath of renewed life in Jesus; know shalom, wholeness in the presence of God.

In our asking and in our answering, we are never finished, certainly, we are never completely finished. Nor are we ever complete, yes, we have begun to become believing and begun to have life in Jesus’ name. Still, the world we live in is dynamic, ever-changing, therefore our believing is always facing new things, and so we face new opportune times to become unbelieving and struggle with lesser life or continue to become, to grow in our believing, living an ever-evolving life in Jesus.

So      me                        Alleluia Christ is risen

congregation        The Lord is risen indeed Alleluia!

May your becoming believing bring you to be a blessing to all (Genesis 12:2-3) (Thompson).


References

Crouch, Frank L. “Commentary on John 20:19-31.” 28 4 2019. Working Preacher. <workingpreacher.org>.

deClaissé-Walford, Nancy. Commentary on Psalm 150. 28 4 2018. <http://www.workingpreacher.org/&gt;.

Epperly, Bruce. The Adventurous Lectionary. 28 4 2019. <http://www.patheos.com/blogs/livingaholyadventure/author/bruceepperly&gt;.

Gaventa, Beverly Roberts and David Petersen. New Interpreter’s One-Volume Commentary. Nashville, n.d.

Harrelson, Walter J. The New Interpreters’ Study Bible. Abingdon Press, 2003. E-book.

Hoezee, Scott. The Lectionary Gospel John 20:19-31. 28 4 2019. <cep.calvinseminary.edu/sermon-starters>.

Keener, Craig and John Walton. NKJV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible Notes. Nashville: Zondervan, 2017.

Lewis, Karoline. Linger A Little. 28 4 2019. <workingpreacher.org>.

O’Day, Dail R. New Interpreter’s Bible Commentary The Gospel of John. Vol. VIII. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2015. XII vols. App Olivetree.

Olive Tree. NKJV Greek-English Interlinear New Testament. Olive Tree Bible Software, 22014.

—. Olive Tree Cross References: Expanded Set. Harper Collins Christian Publishing, 2015.

Sakenfeld, Katharine Doob. New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible. Nashville: Abingdon, 2009.

Thompson, Barkley. “To be a blessing.” 17 3 2019. God in the Midst of the City. <https://rectorspage.wordpress.com/2019/03/17/to-be-a-blessing/&gt;.

Woods, Joshua. “Among His Disciples, Easter 2.” 28 4 2019. Sermons that Work. <episcopalchurch.org/library/sermon>.

Young, Robert. Young’s Literal Translation of the Holy Bible. 1892: Public Domain, n.d.

 

 

 

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Surprise!

A Sermon for Easter; Isaiah 65:17-25, Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24, 1 Corinthians 15:19-26, Luke 24:1-12

Last Sunday a fire broke out at St. John’s the Divine, in the undercroft forcing 100 people to evacuate. There was little damage, but St. John’s had to quickly find and set up a place to hold their 11 am observance of Palm Sunday, which they did (Ferré-Sadurní). Last Monday fire destroyed the roof of Notre Dame Cathedral. There was great damage, but not as much as could have been. Not long before the Fire Department had rehearsed a plan to remove the Cathedrals treasures and relics in case of fire. It worked. Later Monday a fire broke out in Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa Mosque, in a guard’s room near the roof of the Marwani Prayer Room. The firefighters contained the blaze before it could spread (Solly). We now know all these fires were accidental. At the time, the news of the fires was a surprise that made me wonder “What up?”; and I still wonder.

Jaylesya walks every day from her home in a Trailer Park to work at Bojangles. No matter the weather, hot, cold, rain or shine, she walks 6 miles work, spends her 8-hour shift on her feet, and then walks 6 miles home. One day she notices a Sheriff’s Deputy car is following her. She is worried she has done something wrong. The deputy pulls up beside her and asks her to stop. She is afraid to stop but more afraid to keep walking, so she stops. The deputy asks her a few questions and asks if he can give her a ride to work, warily, but gratefully she accepts. From time to time the deputy would stop and give her ride. One day he pulls up alongside and asks her to stop. She does, curious, but no longer concerned. He walks to the back of his car, opens the trunk, and takes out a bicycle, a Schwinn Fairhaven women’s cruiser, donated by a local Wal-Mart. A surprise that began with worrisome caution, ends with joyful thanks (Wilson Times Staff).

On April 6, Mark Edington was consecrated as Bishop of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. I expect the congregation was surprised by the title of the sermon, which begins “Go Away ….” The preacher, Andrew McGowan, is a long-time friend of Bp. Edington, so there is more to this than it first sounds. McGowan shares from frank information, that is not exactly new: a 2016 survey reveals that 39.6% of the French claimed no religion, and is at the forefront of western secularism, probably a trend-setter, not an outlier (McGowan). He goes on to say

Christendom is over in some places, and on its deathbed in others … [and that] elements of Christian faith [appearing as] part and parcel of the life of the West – is over. But the Jesus Movement is not over, the Way of Love is not over – the Church is far from done.

A bit later he notes that Jesus has a way of saying, “go,” or even “go away.” It is not a dismissal, so much as marching orders, for disciples to “go away” and make disciples of all nations. McGowen began his closing

so Mark, welcome, and “go away.” Go away, not because we are pessimistic but because we are hopeful, not because we think God has abandoned us, but because we know God will lead us.

This morning Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary, and other women, who had come with Jesus from Galilee, leave to go do their duty to properly bury their friend, their hope, their future. The last two days have been horrific. Jesus was betrayed, arrested, beaten; subject to a sham of two trials; one a Jewish religious trial, the other a Roman judicial trial; both are replete, full, of fake news, and fake testimonies, so many Pilate doesn’t believe them; nonetheless Jesus was crucified; wrapped in linen cloth and put in a tomb. Then there is the long Saturday as the shadow of death covers a Passover celebration. Their morning begins with expectations of deep sorrow, and hopelessness.

Then they are surprised. The stone in front of the tomb has been rolled away. What can this mean? They go inside, and Jesus’ body is gone, ~ nothing good can come from this. Suddenly two men are with them, they remind the women of what Jesus had taught them, and they do remember ~ everything!

They all go away to share with the disciples what they have experienced. All but one shrug it off as idle chatter. But Peter, in an act of renewed commitment, runs to the tomb to see for himself. He is surprised, all there is in the tomb is the linen burial shroud. Then he returns home amazed by, wondering about, what has happened.

Surprise is the theme of the day. It has come to me that Gospel surprises come in many forms and ways, but generally, fall into a few broad categories. There is the surprise we experience when we realize that Jesus’ wounded hands have grasped ours and is pulling [us] away from whatever coffins [we] are in, from whatever deaths [we] know and fight and fear (STW).

There is the surprise of go away which requires our attention to be fixed on Jesus; If we look for life and direction and meaning anywhere but at the risen Lord—then our hearts will be divided, and our energy will be scattered, and our rising will be slow (STW).

There is the surprise of receiving a simple gift, that transforms your life, something as simple as a bicycle that revolutionizes your daily journey to work.

There is the surprise that leaves us pondering what it means, like a string of seemingly unrelated fires.

There is the surprise when pondering all this we realize we are free;

  • free to simply be free,
  • free focus on Jesus,
  • free to go,
  • free to give away a simple gift,
  • free to be a gift,
  • free to live on a new earth under a new heaven (Isa 65:17),
  • free to ponder the fullness of life alive in Christ (1 Corin. 15:22)

all with glorious the chant proclaiming

Alleluia Christ is risen

          [the congregation joins]

The Lord is risen indeed, Alleluia!

for all the world to hear.

Amen


References

Ferré-Sadurní, Luis. “Fire in Basement Crypt at St. John the Divine Forces Palm Sunday Worshipers Outside.” The New York Times (2019). https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/14/nyregion/st-john-the-divine-fire.html.

Liggett, James. Outstretched Arms, Easter Day. 21 4 2019. <http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/&gt;.

McGowan, Andrew. “GO AWAY: APOSTOLIC MINISTRY, INCLUSION, AND THE FUTURE OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH.” 6 4 2019. http://abmcg.blogspot.com. <http://abmcg.blogspot.com/2019/04/go-away-apostolic-ministry-inclusion.html&gt;.

Solly, Meilan. “A Small Fire Broke Out at Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa Mosque as Flames Ravaged Notre-Dame.” 17 4 2019. SMITHSONIAN.COM. <https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/small-fire-broke-out-jerusalems-al-aqsa-mosque-flames-ravaged-notre-dame-180971983/&gt;.

Wilson Times Staff. “Deputy donates bike to woman who walked 12 miles to and from.” 28 8 2018. wilsontimes.com. 17 4 2019. <wilsontimes.com/stories/deputy-donates-bike-to-woman-who-walked-12-miles-to-and-from-work-pqq14,139562>.

 

 

 

Kintsugi Lives

A sermon for Good Friday; Isaiah 52:13-53:12, Psalm 22, Hebrews 10:16-25, or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9, John 18:1-19:42

My first thoughts for today’s reflections on John’s account of Jesus’ Passion was to build on Mel Gibson’s, The Passion of the Christ. I have done so in the past; however, I have so carefully put those notes away, I can’t find where in 15 years of folders those notes are. What’s a preacher to do? Listen, be still and know that God is God and provides.

The first thing that was given to me was reading about Makato putting a 400-year-old Kintsugi bowl in David’s hands. As old as it is, its most special feature is that somewhere along the way the bowl was broken into shards and glued back together using an ancient technique involving gold dust and lacquer. The golden veins add mystic beauty so that the bowl exceeds its original grandeur. The golden veins add a depth of dimension; ~ you intuit the bowls original form and life; ~ you sense the rupture that shattered its life and form; ~ you are drawn to how it is so beautifully healed, brought to a wholeness that exceeds its original beauty and life (Brooks).

It wasn’t much longer when I read a commentary by Whitney Rice which presented a vision I’ve never explored before. She notes that in the Passion story we see both the desire to follow Jesus, and the fear that leads followers to deny Jesus (Rice). My character set is different, but the revelation is hers.

Let’s begin with Peter. We are familiar with his denial of Jesus. We all have heard, and I have preached, to explore our inner selves in search of our ways that lead us to similar denials. However, we should not overlook Peter’s commitment. Earlier he says

Lord, why can I not follow you now? I will lay down my life for you (John 13:37).

Peter’s pledge varies in intensity in each Gospel account, but we should not discount his sincerity, he means it. Rice ponders if Peter is trying to stand out in the crowd. It is possible, even probable, Peter is known for making impetuous statements, not carefully thought out, in which he stands out in the crowd. In the garden, Peter’s sincerity is evident, when the police and soldier approach he draws his sword and attacks one of the servants, or the high priest’s the servant gets in his way (John 18:10). Either way, Peter’s action is a sign of his commitment, Romans are not known for their patience with armed insurrection. It is the slave’s presence at this event that leads to Peter’s third denial (John 18:23). There is no question Peter is a mixture of commitment and denial. He relationship with Jesus is complex. Peter proclaims Jesus to be the Holy One of God (John 6:69), he swears he will give his life for Jesus’ life, and he means it. That is the completeness of Peter’s life. But as we know, in the courtyard of the High Priest Peter denies Jesus 3 times. The wholeness of his life lies in broken shards on the courtyard paving-stones.

The other examples of complex relationships with Jesus are Joseph of Arrhythmia and Nicodemus. Both men are powerful, members of the Sanhedrin, Israel’s religious and political ruling body. Once, Nicodemus takes a stand for Jesus in a debate saying,

Our law does not judge people without first giving them a hearing to find out what they are doing, does it? (John 7:51).

Joseph is courageous in approaching Pilate to get Jesus body for burial. In doing so he reveals his allegiance to this innocent troublesome rabbi. In these ways, both men show their commitment to Jesus. However, neither man speaks in Jesus defense or makes an effort to constrain the abuse of political and religious power by the High Priest or the Sanhedrin. Like Peter, both are committed to Jesus; and both deny Jesus. Their thundering silence breaks the wholeness of their lives, the shards lay scattered across the Temple grounds.

The golden dust of the Spirit inspires Joseph and Nicodemus to risk asking Pilate for Jesus’ body so he can be buried properly. Unknowingly they set the Easter stage by laying his body in the tomb. The golden dust of the Spirit inspires Peter, a story to be revealed in the weeks to come. Just as gold dust and lacquer restore the whole of a broken bowl into glory beyond its original form, so gold and lacquer, of the Spirit restore the broken lives of Peter, Nicodemus, and Joseph into glory beyond their original forms.

Typically, on Good Friday I am encouraging myself and you to take an honest look at our lives and acknowledge at least one way we have denied Jesus. The story of Kintsugi bowls and Rice’s observation of the complex commitment and denials of Jesus in the lives of his followers weave a complex artistry that takes some lengthy pondering (Brooks). In time, and in varying ways, how our lives are similar to Kintsugi bowls will be revealed. And yes, this is an Easterish gleaning. However, it is also a Lenten, a Good Friday reminder, to commit the time to seek the Kintsugi in everyone one we meet. We are all broken, that is easy to see. It is a failure to be like Jesus not to seek the divine gold-dust and lacquer that remakes all of God’s people, more glorious than either we or they can perceive.

It is Good Friday. The shards of your lives lay scattered across the sands of times. The darkness hovers, it is an opportune time. Can you, will you, believe in healing Spirit’s gold dust and lacquer? Will you trust the potter’s hands of the healing Spirit in the remaking of Kintsugi lives? Yours? And others?


References

Biasdell, Machrina. What’s the Question?, Epiphany 4 (B). 28 1 2018. <http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/&gt;.

Boring, M. Eugene. New Interpreter’s Bible Commentary The Gospel of Matthew. Vol. VII. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2015. XII vols. App Olivetree.

Brooks, David. Longing for an Internet Cleanse. 27 3 2019. <nytimes.com/2019/03/28/opinion/internet-cleanse.html>.

Lewis, Karoline. “Dear Working Preacher Betweenness.” 23 4 2017. Working Preacher.

Rice, Whitney. “The Rock and the Handmaiden, Good Friday.” 19 4 2019. Sermons that Work.

Trozzo, Lindsey. Commentary on John 18:1-19:42. 19 4/ 2019. <http://www.workingpreacher.org/&gt;.

 

Signs

A Sermon for Palm Sunday; The Liturgy of the Palms: Luke 19:28-40, Psalm 118:1-2, 19-29, The Liturgy of the Word: Isaiah 50:4-9a, Philippians 2:5-11, Luke 23:1-49, Psalm 31:9-16

Today we have returned to the traditional Palm Sunday format. For the last several years we have not read the Passion, today we return to that tradition, sort of. I will continue to focus on the reading preceding the procession of Palms, our reenactment of Jesus triumphal entry. I choose to do this because this is a pivotal moment in our Lenten life, a time to reflect upon our reflections. We will have time to reflect on Jesus’ Passion, ~ ~ on Good Friday. Between today and then, you are invited to attend Blytheville’s Holy Week services, schedules are on the hall table. If you cannot you are invited to find ways you can observe this most holy of weeks; there are prayers for every day in Holy Week beginning on pg. 220 (BCP).

The week before last, as I was pondering these next 8 days Les Emmerson’s song Sign Sign Everywhere A Sign played on the radio sparking a thread of thoughts (Emmerson). Emmerson writes about all the rules that surround us. Rules that tell us

  • how to wear our hair;
  • that trespassers will be shot;
  • what we have to wear;
  • where we can and cannot watch, or sit, or eat;
  • that tell us we ain’t supposed to be here; and
  • that we don’t have the right membership.

All those signs remind me of Paul’s list of sins, the things we aren’t supposed to do. If you go looking you will find a list of Paul’s lists. There are lists of

  • sins,
  • sufferings,
  • trials,
  • credentials,
  • spiritual gifts,
  • outcomes of sin,
  • his sins,
  • his accomplishments, and

Given Paul’s background as a Pharisee, the origins of their teaching rules to help the Jewish people keep God’s law, his lists make sense, they could be helpful. Unfortunately, the rules of the Law became the ends in themselves for the Pharisees. I’m concerned Paul’s lists, especially of sins and vices, in our hands, have become ends in themselves. The focus is so much on do this don’t do that, where we can be and that we aren’t supposed to be there, that God’s everlasting, always, everywhere present forgiveness, grace, and love gets lost.

Since Christmas, actually, since Advent, we have been hearing stories of signs. Some stories are full of signs. Some stories are signs. Taken together it is clear God is up to something. This morning a crowd of fishermen, tax collectors, Samaritans, harlots, blind men, demoniacs, and cripples, a ragtag bunch of, pathetically unfit, long sick women, lepers, more cripples, and blind (Culpepper) and everyday people ignore the signs of their long history of occupation and oppression, the signs that tell them they cannot gather, that welcoming this itinerate rabbi, whose birth was announced by angels, and proclaimed by shepherds, who welcomes them, cleans them, raises their dead, and arrives on a colt, to chants of Hosanna, is a highly subversive act of treason (Tew). This morning we witness Jesus’ continuing resistance to the temptation to act in his own self-interest and choosing to follow the path given by divine vision, choosing to challenge religious and political power (Epperly).

Our world is as full of signs as Jesus’ world, and Emmerson’s worlds were. There are signs that tell us,

  • where to go,
  • what to do,
  • where we are welcome, and
  • to stay out.

We have our own signs, that tells others,

  • where to go,
  • what to do,
  • where they are welcome, and
  • to stay out.

There all sorts of signs, all sorts of expectations, all sorts of temptations to act for our own behalf. Like so many things acting our own behalf is a mix of decisions. Sometimes such a decision is a faithful thing, sometimes it is falling to temptation.

This week Joan Chittister wrote about the sixth step of Benedict of Nursia’s sixth-century program of spiritual development. It is “Be content with the lowest and most menial treatment,” meaning that life without expectations is a much happier place to be. More importantly, being content with the least allows you to be who you are, where you are — nothing more, and most importantly nothing less, (Chittister). Because as Jesus’ life and ministry, from Christmas to today, reveals, you are beloved children of God, who every day witness the signs of the peace of heaven right here on earth.

The last verse of the sign song is:

And the sign said, “Everybody welcome.
Come in, kneel down and pray”
But when they passed around the plate
at the end of it all
I didn’t have a penny to pay
So I got me a pen and a paper
and I made up my own little sign
I said, “Thank you, Lord, for thinkin’ ’bout me.
I’m alive and doin’ fine.”

It is a curiously Lenten verse. You know Lent is a season of repentance. Our tendency is to think in terms of saying “sorry” or giving up some evil passion (like chocolate) or taking on some good act (like sending a bag of canned food to the food pantry) to make up for the sinful ones. All that misses the core meaning of the word which is to change direction. In the end, the sign ranter finds his contentment at the least, he discovers who he is, where he is, and he is thankful for it.

Sign, sign, everywhere a sign; this is a week to ignore all the signs, the ones that exclude you and especially the ones that include you. This is a week to seek contentment; to be who you are, where you are. As the times of our lives are getting darker, this week will get darker and darker; today’s cries of “Halleluiahs” will become shouts of “Crucify him!” We will need all of who we are because as the darkness grows, we will be tempted to believe that the light is faltering. It is an opportune sign (Luke 4:13).


References

Chittister, Joan. “From Where I Stand – step-6-it-possible-be-contented-even-disappointments.” National Catholic Reporter. 10 4 2019. <ncronline.org/news/opinion/where-i-stand/step-6-it-possible-be-contented-even-disappointments>.

Culpepper, R. Alan. New Interpreter’s Bible Commentary The Gospel of Luke. Vol. 8. Abbington, 2015. 12 vols. Olive Tree App.

Emmerson, Les. “Sign Sign Everywhere A Sign.” Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, n.d. 10 4 2019. <google.com/search>.

Epperly, Bruce. The Adventurous Lectionary. 14 4 2018. <http://www.patheos.com/blogs/livingaholyadventure/author/bruceepperly&gt;.

Tew, Anna. “Protesters, Palm Sunday (C).” 14 4 2018. Sermons that Work. <episcopalchurch.org/library/sermon/protesters-palm-sunday-c-april-14-2019>.

The Episcopal Church. The Book of Common Prayer. New York: Church Publishing, 1979.