See the Presence of the Resurrection Promise

A Sermon for Easter 3: Acts 2:14a, 36-41, Psalm 116:1-3, 10-17, 1 Peter 1:17 23, Luke 24:13-35

For 60 years, a mysterious unnamed monk has wandered around the world protecting an ancient scroll that holds the key to unlimited power. It is time for the Monk to find a new scroll keeper. The unnamed monk is inadvertently saved by Kar, a streetwise young man whose only interest is himself. They become reluctant partners as they and an equally hesitant Russian mob princess, known as Bad Girl, struggle to find, face, and fight the ultimate enemy, in a harrowing effort to save the world from the scroll’s most avid pursuer (IMDB). At the heart of the story is an ancient prophecy that the protector of the scroll is revealed as one fighting for justice while cranes circled overhead, fighting for love under a palace of jade, and rescuing friends he never met with family he never knew he had.

The Monk is looking for a situation that was the same as when he became the scroll’s guardian 60 years ago when his mentor is killed, by the evil man who pursues the scroll today. He realizes fulfilling the prophecy will be different when he recognizes that the Palace of Jade is Jade, otherwise known as Bad Girl; that the cranes overhead are the construction cranes above the site of the final battle for control of the scroll where Kar defeats the evil man seeking the scroll to use its power for selfish purposes, while Jade frees other monks who were imprisoned and left to die by the scroll’s ultimate enemy, thus rescuing friends with family she never knew. The Nameless Monk sees that the prophecy is being fulfilled, just in ways that he could never have imagined, and he passes along the scroll’s hidden secret and its guardianship to Kar and Jade (Wikipedia).

Jesus is dead; crucified by the Romans at the behest of Jewish officials. The same day that Mary discovers the empty tomb, two of Jesus’ disciples (or should we say former disciples) are walking to Emmaus. They walked through the valley of death. Their lives and hopes are in utter shambles (Hoch). Along the way, they meet a stranger. We will always wonder if they did not recognize him because they were so busy looking elsewhere, or if their eyes, like Pharaoh’s heart, were hardened (Ellingsen). Everything they had experienced or been taught made it almost impossible for them to imagine God’s work in Jesus crucified (Lose).

The stranger doesn’t know about Jesus’ death. Cleopas and his traveling partner wonder how was it possible that there is anyone who didn’t know what had happened to Jesus. That his followers, had not just lost the one they loved, but also the one who was going to restore David’s Kingdom, throw the Romans out and make life worth living (Whitley). To Jesus’ disciples, this was headline news. But to most of the people, it might have been casual news. It was really nothing more than another Roman crucifixion. And those happen all the time (Hoezee). Regardless of their questions, they share all of their story. A story that reveals that their expectations were that Jesus was the hoped for a prophet; Moses’ successor (Luke 24:19) (Harrelson). Their expectations show us their lack of awareness of who Jesus’ really was. When their story is over, Jesus shares with them a summary of the whole of Jewish history and religious thought. His teaching offered them a new lens for engaging Scripture, although they could not recognize it; at least not yet (Gaventa and Petersen).

At the end of their journey, the disciples offer the traditional but not expected hospitality, and invite Jesus to stay. At dinner, Jesus takes the bread, gives thanks, breaks it, and gives to them. The disciples remember the taking, giving thanks, breaking and giving bread and fish when Jesus feed 5000 out in the country (Luke 9:16). They remember Jesus taking, giving thanks, breaking and giving the bread at the last Passover meal (Luke 22:17) (Hoezee). Jesus’ actions at the dinner table in at Emmaus provokes powerful memories. The guest becomes the host (Culpepper). Luke tells us that these words and gestures open their eyes and that they recognized Jesus (Gaventa and Petersen; Whitley). Allan Culpepper notes that Aristotle taught that recognition is a change from ignorance to knowledge; it can lead to either to friendliness or to hostility; recognition determines the direction for good or ill the futures of those involved (Culpepper). For the disciples recognizing Jesus allows then to see a whole new future.

Immediately after this, Jesus disappears. Dinner is over. The inspired disciples head back to Jerusalem.

You know all about this Emmaus journey (Epperly). Every day, you walk some form a road that you are uncertain about. You wonder about your destinations or are perhaps you are concerned about your future, about our future. You know from the Emmaus story that every day Jesus meets you on your road, in the ordinary places and experiences of your lives, in the in-between moments of your lives, and in the places where you retreat to when life is just too much (Culpepper). The question is: Are our hearts, ears, and eyes open? Can we see the world not constrained by our presumptions? Will we be able to see beyond the limits of our betweenness (Lewis, Betweenness) Will we be able to find composure when we are distraught? Will we be able to be calm when we are frantic? Will we be able to recognize safety and hope when we are desperate? Will we be assured or re-assured when we are distracted, (Hoezee)? The deepest question is: Do we trust our faith stories enough to be really honest with ourselves and name our pains, our grief, our losses. Do we trust our faith stories enough, to know that naming our pains, our grief, and our losses allows God/Jesus/Spirit to empower us to transcend them so that they can no longer define us (Lose)?

The disciples knew their faith stories of Moses and the prophets. You know your faith story and the promise that you are heirs to Jesus’ resurrection. The disciples saw Jesus take, bless, break, and share when he feed thousands with a few loaves of bread and a couple of fish (Luke 9:16). They saw Jesus take, bless, break and give at their last Passover supper (Luke 22:17). You share in taking, blessing, breaking, and sharing, in every Eucharist. You have everything going for you, that the disciples had going for them.

Actually, you have more, because our faith story is very clear that God is not static, not bound by yesterday’s revelations or the church’s creeds, scriptures and structures.
God is alive, on the move, doing new things and sharing new insights with people, with us all the time (Epperly).

The unnamed monk knew the possibilities of his guiding prophecy through ancient traditions. That knowledge shaped how he saw the world. Only when he is able to let go of what he thought, he is able to see that the prophecy is different in today’s world and then he is able to recognize cranes over the fight for justice, the house of Jade, and the one rescuing unknown friends with undiscovered family. Only when the disciples were able to let go of Moses, and the prophets are they were able to see that take, bless, break and give reveals the new hope. It is only when we are able to let go of what we were, or think we were, that we will be able to see the presence of the resurrection promise, in this moment, that offers new life and new hope.


References

Culpepper, R. Alan. New Interpreter’s Bible Luke. Vol. 8. Abbington, 2015. 12 vols. Olive Tree App.

Ellingsen, Mark. Lectionary Scripture Notes. 30 4 2017. <http://www.lectionaryscripturenotes.com/&gt;.

Epperly, Bruce. The Adventurous Lectionary. 30 4 2017. 12. <http://www.patheos.com/blogs/livingaholyadventure/author/bruceepperly&gt;.

Gaventa, Beverly Roberts and David Petersen. New Interpreter’s One Volume Commentary. Nashville, n.d.

Harrelson, Walter J. The New Interpreters’ Study Bible. Abingdon Press, 2003. E-book.

Hoch, Robert. Commentary on Luke 24:1335. 30 4 2017. <http://www.workingpreacher.org/&gt;.

Hoezee, Scott. Easter 3A Luke 24:13-35 . 30 4 2017. <http://cep.calvinseminary.edu/sermon-starters/advent-3c/?type=the_lectionary_gospel&gt;.

IMDB. Bulletproof Monk. n.d. 28 4 2017. <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0245803/&gt;.

Lewis, Karoline. “Dear Working Preacher Betweenness.” 23 4 2017. Working preacher.

—. Dear Working Preacher What Things? 30 4 2017. <http://www.workingpreacher.org/craft.aspx?post=4706 1/3>.

Lose, David. Easter 3 A: Dashed Hopes and Surprising Grace. 30 4 2017.

Sakenfeld, Katharine Doob. New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible. Nashville: Abingdon, 2009.

Whitley, Katerina. Seeing through Doubt, Easter 3(A). 30 4 2017. <http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/&gt;.

Wikipedia. Bulletproof Monk. n.d. 28 4 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulletproof_Monk&gt;.